Îlots insalubres (2)

FURORE #21, p. 68-69

In Furore #21 (p. 68-69) we describe a key location of the chase scene in The Red Balloon: the passage Ronce, which used to run between the rue Julien-Lacroix and the rue des Couronnes.

Le Ballon rouge 24’31” © 1956 Films Montsouris

18 and 19 Passage Ronce seen from the rue des Couronnes.

La Crise du logement 24'10"

At the end of Jean Dewever’s propaganda doc La Crise du logement (1956), filmed at roughly the same time as The Red Balloon, is a view of the passage Ronce as seen from the rue Julien-Lacroix. The school still exists today; the rest is gone.

Passage Ronce, July 2010 © Piet Schreuders

Îlots insalubres (2)

FURORE #21, p. 68-69

In Furore #21 (p. 68-69) we describe a key location of the chase scene in The Red Balloon: the passage Ronce, which used to run between the rue Julien-Lacroix and the rue des Couronnes.

Le Ballon rouge 24’31” © 1956 Films Montsouris

18 and 19 Passage Ronce seen from the rue des Couronnes.

At the end of Jean Dewever’s propaganda doc La Crise du logement (1956), filmed at roughly the same time as The Red Balloon, is a view of the passage Ronce as seen from the rue Julien-Lacroix. The school still exists today; the rest is gone.

Passage Ronce, July 2010 © Piet Schreuders

Îlots insalubres (2)

In Furore #21 (p. 68-69) we describe a key location of the chase scene in The Red Balloon: the passage Ronce, which used to run between the rue Julien-Lacroix and the rue des Couronnes.

Le Ballon rouge 24’31” © 1956 Films Montsouris

18 and 19 Passage Ronce seen from the rue des Couronnes.

At the end of Jean Dewever’s propaganda doc La Crise du logement (1956), filmed at roughly the same time as The Red Balloon, is a view of the passage Ronce as seen from the rue Julien-Lacroix. The school still exists today; the rest is gone.

Passage Ronce, July 2010 © Piet Schreuders

Îlots insalubres (1)

FURORE #21, p. 65

In Furore #21 (p. 65) we describe Albert Lamorisse’s creative use of the passage Notre-Dame-de-la-Croix in The Red Balloon’s climactic chase scene. At 27:26 the voyous follow Pascal into the passage, running north towards the intersection of cité Billon.

 

The Red Balloon Sc 14 - 27:26 © Films Montsouris
La Crise du logement 17’15”

This propaganda film in the guise of a documentary (Prix Louis Lumière 1956) makes a case for the destruction of 200,000 homes in Paris because they are “dangerous for the health of the inhabitants”.
“Today we must urgently evcuate and destroy the dilapidated neighborhoods, the slums, to recover the land required for the erection of a modern city,” an overly enthusiastic voice-over proclaims.

Passage Notre-Dame-de-la-Croix, 1955 (Dewever) © Oka Films

Filmed at roughly the same time as The Red Balloon, La Crise du ligement offers a view of the same alley.

Passage Notre-Dame-de-la-Croix, 6 March 1957 © Pavillon de l’Arsenal

At 17’02” in this Daily Motion excerpt we see the Passage Notre-Dame-de-la-Croix seen from the rue de la Mare. As the camera pans left, revealing the corner of the rue d’Eupatoria, there’s a marble plaque commemorating resistance fighter André Durand who once lived “au no. 13 de ce passage”.

Photo © 2010 Mu

As the entire passage and surrounding buildings were demolished in the 1960s the marble plate must have been destroyed too.
A replacement marble plaque is now installed somewhere in the area (exact location yet to be checked).

CreditsLa Crise du logement
1955 25 min B&W, 35mm
Writer director: Jean Dewever
Assistant director: Michel Wyn René Briot
Head cameraman: Roger Monteran
Editing: Geneviève Cortier, Maryse Barbut (Siclier)
Narrated by Roland Menard and Françoise Fechter
Original music by René Cloerec
Sound engineer: Jacques Lebreton
Sound studios: Boulogne Laboratoires L.T.C.
Production: Oka Films (J. Dewever)

 

Îlots insalubres (1)

FURORE #21, p. 65

In Furore #21 (p. 65) we describe Albert Lamorisse’s creative use of the passage Notre-Dame-de-la-Croix in The Red Balloon’s climactic chase scene. At 27:26 the voyous follow Pascal into the passage, running north towards the intersection of cité Billon.

 

The Red Balloon Sc 14 - 27:26 © Films Montsouris
La Crise du logement 17’15”

This propaganda film in the guise of a documentary (Prix Louis Lumière 1956) makes a case for the destruction of 200,000 homes in Paris because they are “dangerous for the health of the inhabitants”.
“Today we must urgently evcuate and destroy the dilapidated neighborhoods, the slums, to recover the land required for the erection of a modern city,” an overly enthusiastic voice-over proclaims.

Passage Notre-Dame-de-la-Croix, 1955 (Dewever) © Oka Films

Filmed at roughly the same time as The Red Balloon, La Crise du ligement offers a view of the same alley.

Passage Notre-Dame-de-la-Croix, 6 March 1957 © Pavillon de l’Arsenal

At 17’02” in this Daily Motion excerpt we see the Passage Notre-Dame-de-la-Croix seen from the rue de la Mare. As the camera pans left, revealing the corner of the rue d’Eupatoria, there’s a marble plaque commemorating resistance fighter André Durand who once lived “au no. 13 de ce passage”.

Photo © 2010 Mu

As the entire passage and surrounding buildings were demolished in the 1960s the marble plate must have been destroyed too.
A replacement marble plaque is now installed at 23 rue d’Eupatoria.

CreditsLa Crise du logement
1955 25 min B&W. 35mm
Writer director: Jean Dewever
Assistant director: Michel Wyn René Briot
Head cameraman: Roger Monteran
Editing: Geneviève Cortier, Maryse Barbut (Siclier)
Narrated by Roland Menard and Françoise Fechter
Original music by René Cloerec.
Sound engineer: Jacques Lebreton
Sound studios: Boulogne Laboratoires L.T.C.
Production: Oka Films (J. Dewever)

 

Îlots insalubres (1)

In Furore #21 (p. 65) we describe Albert Lamorisse’s creative use of the passage Notre-Dame-de-la-Croix in The Red Balloon’s climactic chase scene. At 27:26 the voyous follow Pascal into the passage, running north towards the intersection of cité Billon.

 

The Red Balloon Sc 14 - 27:26 © Films Montsouris
La Crise du logement 17’15”

This propaganda film in the guise of a documentary (Prix Louis Lumière 1956) makes a case for the destruction of 200,000 homes in Paris because they are “dangerous for the health of the inhabitants”.
“Today we must urgently evcuate and destroy the dilapidated neighborhoods, the slums, to recover the land required for the erection of a modern city,” an overly enthusiastic voice-over proclaims.

Passage Notre-Dame-de-la-Croix, 1955 (Dewever) © Oka Films

Filmed at roughly the same time as The Red Balloon, La Crise du ligement offers a view of the same alley.

Passage Notre-Dame-de-la-Croix, 6 March 1957 © Pavillon de l’Arsenal

At 17’02” in this Daily Motion excerpt we see the Passage Notre-Dame-de-la-Croix seen from the rue de la Mare. As the camera pans left, revealing the corner of the rue d’Eupatoria, there’s a marble plaque commemorating resistance fighter André Durand who once lived “au no. 13 de ce passage”.

Photo © 2010 Mu

As the entire passage and surrounding buildings were demolished in the 1960s the marble plate must have been destroyed too.
A replacement marble plaque is now installed somewhere in the area (exact location yet to be checked).

CreditsLa Crise du logement
1955 25 min B&W. 35mm
Writer director: Jean Dewever
Assistant director: Michel Wyn René Briot
Head cameraman: Roger Monteran
Editing: Geneviève Cortier, Maryse Barbut (Siclier)
Narrated by Roland Menard and Françoise Fechter
Original music by René Cloerec.
Sound engineer: Jacques Lebreton
Sound studios: Boulogne Laboratoires L.T.C.
Production: Oka Films (J. Dewever)

 

Histoire d’un poisson rouge

Teyo Peperkamp writes:

“Do you know Histoire d’un Poisson Rouge? I’ve never seen this film, but judging by the photographs in this EP booklet I am sure it must be a beautiful movie! Hopefully it will be released on DVD soon. In any case, the music and the story on the record are hard to resist!”

Edmond Séchan was also the cameraman for The Red Balloon.

Histoire d’un poisson rouge

Teyo Peperkamp (Zwolle) schrijft:

“Kent u ook Histoire d’un Poisson Rouge? Ik heb hem helaas nog nooit gezien, maar als ik de fotootjes bekijk in het boekje bij de EP dan weet ik zeker dat dit ook een heel mooi filmpje moet zijn! Hopelijk komt het spoedig tot een uitgave op dvd. De muziek en de vertelling op het grammofoonplaatje zijn in elk geval onweerstaanbaar!”

Edmond Séchan was ook de cameraman van Le Ballon rouge.

Histoire d’un poisson rouge

Teyo Peperkamp writes:

“Do you know Histoire d’un Poisson Rouge? I’ve never seen this film, but judging by the photographs in this EP booklet I am sure it must be a beautiful movie! Hopefully it will be released on DVD soon. In any case, the music and the story on the record are hard to resist!”

Edmond Séchan was also the cameraman for The Red Balloon.

Narrower and narrower

In the fall of 1955 Pascal Lamorisse was seen running down a narrow alleyway trying to escape from a band of “voyous”.

As we point out in Furore (p. 70), this scene was shot in one of the two narrowest alleys in all of Paris. Here is an archive photo of the same alley in 1962.

Image courtesy of Pavillon de l'Arsenal, Paris

Ten years after The Red Balloon, another Pascal was running through the same alley. It was actor Pascal Fardoulis in the experimental short Les Pays loin (1965) by Jean Rollin. Note that the buildings on the right have not survived the preceding decade.

(Thanks to Roland-François Lack of The CineTourist for alerting me to this movie)

Narrower and narrower

In the fall of 1955 Pascal Lamorisse was seen running down a narrow alleyway trying to escape from a band of “voyous”.

As we point out in Furore (p. 70), this scene was shot in one of the two narrowest alleys in all of Paris. Here is an archive photo of the same alley in 1962.

Image courtesy of Pavillon de l'Arsenal, Paris

Ten years after The Red Balloon, another Pascal was running through the same alley. It was actor Pascal Fardoulis in the experimental short Les Pays loin (1965) by Jean Rollin. Note that the buildings on the right have not survived the preceding decade.

(Thanks to Roland-François Lack of The CineTourist for alerting me to this movie)

Narrower and narrower

Le Ballon rouge 28'19"

In the fall of 1955 Pascal Lamorisse was seen running down a narrow alleyway trying to escape from a band of “voyous”.

As we point out in Furore (p. 70), this scene was shot in one of the two narrowest alleys in all of Paris. Here is an archive photo of the same alley in 1962.

Image courtesy of Pavillon de l'Arsenal, Paris

Ten years after The Red Balloon, another Pascal was running through the same alley. It was actor Pascal Fardoulis in the experimental short Les Pays loin (1965) by Jean Rollin. Note that the buildings on the right have not survived the preceding decade.

Les Pays loin, 01'01"

(Thanks to Roland-François Lack of The CineTourist for alerting me to this movie)